Palliative care and pressure ulcers – A daughter’s perspective (who just happens to be a TVN)

This powerful insight into a daughter’s perspective on palliative care and pressure ulcers written by a TVS member who’s location and identity have been withheld to protect privacy.

Mum is in hospital

She has a hospital acquired DTI on her left buttock (left sided weakness after a very dense stroke). She had such beautiful skin before admission. Great skin! It wasn’t vulnerable at all.

How do I feel?

As a TVN daughter – annoyed – how did it happen to someone who is well nourished with previously great skin. Do I complain? Everyone is so kind. But this was avoidable surely?

During my only visit (Covid visiting restrictions were still in place) to see her, an extremely kind Health Care Assistant (HCA) who was wonderful with her and giving beautiful mouth care, told me that they leave her 4 (more…)

PRESSURE ULCERS, DO WE NEED A RE-THINK?

“Is a rethink required around the strategies to prevent PUs or are the PUs we are now seeing due to the advancing age, severity of illness and number of co-morbidities patients in our care are experiencing? Read the latest blog from Joanna Swan, Senior lecturer in Tissue Viability, Birmingham City University and TVS Trustee

Pressure ulcers (PUs) continue to cause concern amongst Healthcare Professionals. We know the high cost to the NHS and the cost to the individuals that are living with them but the PU problem just doesn’t seem to be going away. Reductions in numbers and severity have been made, yet it feels as though we’ve come to an impasse. Is a rethink required around the strategies to prevent PUs or are the PUs we are now seeing due to the advancing age, severity of illness and number of co-morbidities patients in our care are experiencing? Personally, I think it’s both. (more…)

Do you want to be a Pressure Ulcer Hero?

Read the latest blog from Tina Chambers, Clinical Nurse Specialist in Tissue Viability & TVS Trustee, on how you can be a Pressure Ulcer Hero!

Mirrors are an essential piece of equipment for those that care. They give you a super power and make you a Pressure Ulcer Hero.

What does a mirror mean to you? Do you use one for your make up or shaving? Or is it essential when cleaning your teeth? We all have associations with mirrors. As children when we lost my sister shopping she could always be found looking in a mirror.

As a nurse of many years standing (I will not say how long), mirrors were available to help our patients with shaving. They were made of glass and (more…)

It is OK to put yourself first

A personal account from Clare Greenwood, Clinical Nurse Specialist – Tissue Viability, Leeds Teaching Hospitals on being a key worker, post grad student, wife and mother

Calmness can be skin deep…

I never really thought of myself as an anxious person. Yes, I would replay some conversations over and over in my head, worrying that I might have said something that could have been misinterpreted or offended someone, but I would tell myself that’s normal right? I would pride myself in how others would perceive me as a calm and approachable person, and that ‘things never phase you’, but to that gentle and calm exterior, can be very different on the interior.

Keeping a healthy life balance can be really challenging…

I have been working towards a PhD for the last 7.5 years alongside my clinical work as a Tissue Viability Nurse Specialist. A part time PhD normally takes 5 years, but I suspended twice whilst on maternity leave. People would often comment on “I don’t know how you have the time, doing your PhD, whilst working and with two young children” but I would try and be organised with my time, making sure they all got adequate amounts of my attention, whilst also maintaining some element of self-care, which for me was having some alone time sewing, reading or running.

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The Reality

This powerful insight into the effect of COVID-19 on the critical care workforce has been written by a TVS member who’s location and identity have been withheld to protect privacy.

“We have practiced the technique of proning critically ill adults for many years and always approach this method from a multidisciplinary team approach, with a sound evidence base. Our critical care workforce, although not experienced in caring for patients diagnosed with Covid-19, are therefore highly experienced and experts in the technique of proning patients. But what Covid-19 did was stretch and dilute our critical care workforce.

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